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Sevastyan Teterin
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Where Can I Buy Silver Eagle Coins


The U.S. Mint launched the American Eagle Coin Program in 1986 with gold and silver bullion coins for investors. The program has since expanded to include platinum and palladium coins. The Mint also makes proof and uncirculated versions of the American Eagle coins for collecting.




where can i buy silver eagle coins



American Eagle Palladium Coins were first released in 2017 as bullion and 2018 as proof. Like the silver coins, the palladium coins re-create historic designs by Adolph Weinman. The obverse features Liberty wearing a cap with wings used on the 1916 Mercury Dime. The reverse shows an eagle grasping a branch first used on the 1907 American Institute of Architects Gold Medal.


American Eagle Bullion Coins provide investors with a convenient and cost effective way to add a small amount of physical gold, silver, platinum, or palladium to their investment portfolios. The gold bullion coins are available in four sizes: one ounce, one-half ounce, one-quarter ounce, and one-tenth ounce. The silver, platinum, and palladium bullion coins are available in the one ounce size.


The Mint produces American Eagle Coins for collectors with proof and uncirculated finishes. The gold and silver coins are released in both proof and uncirculated finishes each year. The platinum coins are currently made only as proof, while the palladium coins switch finishes each year.


The first American Silver Eagle coins from the United States Mint were issued with 1986 date marks on the obverse side of the coin. The Silver Eagle program consists only of a 1 Troy oz silver coin with .999 purity and a face value of $1 (USD) backed by the federal government. The US Mint uses images of Lady Liberty and the American bald eagle on the obverse and reverse sides of the coin, respectively. The designs never change and the only variation in the coins is the use of a mint mark on the reverse side of the proof coins.


American Silver Eagle coinage consists of uncirculated, proof, and burnished options. The uncirculated, or bullion, coin has been available every year since 1986. The proof Silver Eagle was also issued immediately in 1986 with the uncirculated coin. The proof coin did have a production interruption in 2009 as the US Mint was forced to suspend collectible coinage production to redirect all silver blanks to the uncirculated program to meet the intense demand for silver at the time. Burnished coins were introduced as a second collectible option in 2006 on the 20th anniversary of the coin program. The burnished coin was suspended in both 2009 and 2010, but has since entered back into production.


For a unique choice when buying American Silver Eagles, JM Bullion is happy to offer our new MintSealed lineup. Available for only a select few major silver bullion collection, MintSealed products are available to you in the exact condition and packaging from the mint of issue. These coins have never been touched or tampered with in any way, ensuring that each coin is as it was when placid in its tube by the mint.


The uncirculated coin is an investment-grade coin with a slight shine to the finish of the coins, but it otherwise possesses no remarkable visual brilliance. The proof and burnished coins are both collectible options that do have visual brilliance, but they are produced differently and have slightly different visual aspects. The proof coin has frosted, matte elements on the images of Walking Liberty on the obverse and the heraldic eagle on the reverse. The background of the proof coins is mirrored and clear in appearance.


The burnished coins have a slightly different appearance. The coins are first rolled in a drum with a polishing material that burnishes the coin, adding a distinct visual brilliance that is somewhere between that of the bullion coin and the proof coin. Each burnished coin is carefully handled by employees wearing gloves. Each blank is removed from the drum by a gloved hand, individually loaded into the coining press and struck, and then individually removed and packaged immediately to prevent any chance of human skin oils or other elements tarnishing the visual appeal.


When the bullion Gold Eagles were introduced in 1986, demand exceeded 1.3 million for the 1 oz coin alone, with the oz, oz, and 1/10 oz coins hitting 599,000, 726,000, and 912,000 respectively. Demand for the coins cooled throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, before peaking again in the late 1990s and into the early 2000s. The early to mid-2000s saw another significant decline in mintage figures, until the onset of the Great Recession in 2008, when the gold eagles soared to new heights with mintage figures of 1.49 million, 110,000, 110,000, and 270,000 respectively from 1 oz down to 1/10 oz.


Although the Burnished American Gold Eagle undergoes a similar coining process to proof coins, the appearance of these coins is often compared more closely to that of the bullion coin in the series. The polishing process the coins go through before striking, along with the higher pressure coining process, leaves each coin with a softly frosted appearance. The process also creates a more detailed appearance to the design features, such as Lady Liberty and the bald eagles on the reverse.


When interacting with a local precious metals dealer, you can take possession of the silver immediately after purchase (when in stock). Furthermore, you know exactly where to find the dealer if something were to go wrong.


The U.S. Mint strikes Silver Eagles and certifies their purity, weight, and content. These uncirculated coins have always enjoyed high demand because they are eligible for inclusion in a precious metals IRA, making them affordable instruments of portfolio diversification when compared to gold. Read more about IRA approved gold and silver coins.


On May 27, 1982, Senator McClure introduced bill S. 2598, "A bill to provide for the disposal of silver from the National Defense Stockpile through the issuance of silver coins", to "redirect the sale of silver from our national defense stockpile in an effort to minimize its affect [sic] on the already depressed price of silver."[14] An identical companion bill, H.R. 6649, was introduced on June 22 by Representative Larry E. Craig (R-Idaho) but both bills were referred to committees and never were enacted. The Wall Street Journal reported on June 30 that the price of silver "soared after Interior Secretary James Watt announced that sales of the government's silver stockpile will be indefinitely postponed" as the government's legally required study on potential methods of selling the silver had been delayed.[15]


As a result of the global recession, the demand from investors for bullion coins as a hedge against inflation and economic downturn surged.[49] This increased demand began to affect the availability of American Silver Eagle bullion coins in February 2008 when sales to authorized dealers were suspended temporarily. In March 2008, sales increased ninefold from the month before (from 200,000 to 1,855,000).[49][50] In April 2008, the United States Mint began an allocation program, effectively rationing Silver Eagle bullion coins to authorized dealers on a weekly basis due to "unprecedented demand".[49] At least one observer[51] has questioned the legality of the allocation program, as the Treasurer of the United States is required by law (31 U.S.C. 5112(e)) to mint and issue these coins "in quantities sufficient to meet public demand". On June 6, 2008, the Mint announced that all incoming silver planchets were being used to produce only bullion issues of the Silver Eagle and not proof or uncirculated collectible issues.[52] The 2008 Proof Silver Eagle became unavailable for purchase from the United States Mint in August 2008 and the 2008 Uncirculated Silver Eagle sold out in January 2009 (however, it was available as part of the "2008 Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set" until it sold out on January 28, 2010).[53]


... [B]ecause we could not produce these popular coin products, those who had become accustomed to purchasing them on an annual basis were very disappointed. As Director of the United States Mint, I appreciate the disappointment of these collectors, but I am encouraged to know that the Subcommittee is exploring the possibility of an amendment to the law that would afford the Secretary the authority to approve the minting and issuance of American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins even when we are unable to meet the public's demand for the bullion versions of these coins. American Eagle coin collectors and our many other customers who purchase these products as gifts would likely welcome such a change. Indeed, such a change would be one of the most positive customer satisfaction measures that could be taken to benefit your coin collecting constituents without having an effect on American's [sic] ability to acquire investment-grade silver bullion. We have already provided you technical drafting assistance that your staff have requested to accomplish this change; however, such a change needs to be enacted soon. We can mint 200,000 per month, and if we can begin by September, we will be able to produce about 830,000 one-ounce silver American Eagle coins to meet collector demand for this product in the remaining months of 2010.


The Silver Eagle coins were sold out in the first week of July 2015. The Mint said its facility in West Point, New York, continued to produce coins and it resumed sales at the end of July 2015. This was the second time the mint's silver coins had sold out in the past nine months. The Mint ran out of 2014-dated American Eagles in November 2014. In 2013, the historic drop in silver increased demand for silver coins, forcing the mint to ration silver coin sales for 18 months.[66]


To make up for the reduced and later suspended production of silver bullion coins, the Philadelphia Mint struck 240,000 American Silver Eagles from April 8 through April 20,[70] making them among the rarest uncirculated issues to date.[71] Although these coins were physically identical to the West Point coins, coin grading companies began certifying Philadelphia Mint Silver Eagles as "Emergency Issues."[72] Production at West Point continued on April 21.[70] 041b061a72


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